Blog

Jun 28
2014

DO NOT LEAVE PCOS UNTREATED

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

DO NOT LEAVE PCOS UNTREATED

Apr 25
2014

Do Sugar, Alcohol, and Diabetes Mix?

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

 

Mar 20
2014

Fortify Your Knowledge About Vitamins

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

Vitamins are essential nutrients that contribute to a healthy life. Although most people get all the vitamins they need from the foods they eat, millions of people worldwide take supplemental vitamins as part of their health regimen.

Mar 19
2014

Diabetes, Insulin Overdose, and Other Complications

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

Cold sweats, trembling hands, intense anxiety, a general sense of confusion -- no, it's not the night before final exams. These are the signs of low blood sugar or hypoglycemia, which can result from an insulin overdose, a potentially dangerous complication of diabetes.

May 23
2013

SVR associated with lower risk for diabetes in HCV

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

ORLANDO, Fla. — Patients with hepatitis C who achieve a sustained virologic response after treatment have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to research presented here at Digestive Disease Week.

May 20
2013

Dos and Don'ts: Supporting Loved Ones With Diabetes

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

Family and friends can be true life lines for people living with diabetes — they can lend a helping hand or shoulder to lean on at just the right moment. Studies show that people are able to manage their diabetes better when they have support from loved ones. It helps them to know they’re not going through it alone.

May 14
2013

Is Colon Cleansing Necessary?

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

If digestive health problems like constipation, diarrhea, gas, or heartburn, put a damper on your day-to-day, you may have thought about a colon cleanse, but you don't have to undergo the procedure to improve your health. Before you sign up, be sure to get the facts and decide whether the benefits really outweigh the risks.

May 11
2013

Is It an Allergy or a Cold?

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

It’s not always easy to know when you've got a seasonal allergy and when you're suffering from a cold.

May 10
2013

Triggers That Change Your Metabolism

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

If you’ve ever had trouble losing weight, you’ve probably placed at least some of the blame on a slow metabolism. It’s true that your basal metabolic rate — the rate at which your body uses energy — can affect your ability to shed pounds. But there are also a few external, controllable factors that can slow down that metabolic rate, says Michael West, MD, an endocrinologist with Washington Endocrine Clinic in Washington, D.C.

May 07
2013

Signs of High and Low Blood Sugar

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

One of the challenges of managing diabetes is maintaining consistent blood sugar (glucose) levels. Even with diligence, some situations can cause high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, while others can bring on low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia.

Apr 27
2013

Top Reasons Not to Quit Coffee

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

Many studies have found that coffee has numerous components — many of them antioxidants — that can be good for your health. Although too much caffeine can be dehydrating, drinking at least one cup of coffee a day, according to a recent Japanese study, can cut your risk for bleeding in the brain.

Apr 26
2013

Time Vs. Intensity: What Matters Most in a Workout

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

When it comes to working out, slow and steady may be the way to go.

Apr 17
2013

Start With a Better Breakfast

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

Here’s a good deal of science behind eating a balanced breakfast — it sets you up to succeed for the entire day. “Studies support that you need to start your day off with a healthy breakfast,” says Bethany Thayer, RD, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association and manager of wellness programs and strategies at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. 

Apr 16
2013

Vitamins for Women: What to Take and When

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

More than half of all American adults take multivitamins or other dietary supplements, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Women in particular have been quick to jump on the supplement bandwagon, despite past research that challenged the effectiveness of multivitamins in the prevention of cancer and heart disease. Recent studies have found other benefits of vitamins, including a boost in brainpower as you age. Though experts say food is still your most important source of nutrients, they also say meeting daily dietary needs is vital to long-term health. Supplements can help you fill in nutritional gaps.

Apr 12
2013

Can A Broken Heart Cause Heart Attack?

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

More than a romantic sentiment, a broken heart may be physically possible, according to the findings of a recent study. An international group of researchers interviewed nearly 2,000 people hospitalized after a heart attack. One of the questions they asked was whether a loved one had died within the past six months. Based on the participants’ responses, the researchers were able to calculate that heart attack risk rises to as much as 21 times higher than normal within the first day after the death of a loved one and six times higher during that first week. The risk, they found, remains elevated for at least a month.

Apr 11
2013

Brisk Walking May Equal Running for Heart Health

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

Brisk walking is as good as running for reducing blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes risk -- three key players in the development of heart disease, a new study finds.

Apr 10
2013

Diabetes Prevention Research: A Small Sliver of a Big Pie

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

Most diabetes research focuses on treating the disease with medications rather than preventing it, according to a new analysis from researchers at Duke University. Their research also uncovered the fact that few trials specifically target seniors and children, groups that may require specially tailored diabetes prevention and treatment approaches.
 
Experts project that more than 550 million people worldwide will have diabetes by 2030, and nearly 400 million more may be living with prediabetes by that time, according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Identifying successful prevention approaches through research could help slow the global epidemic.
 
The Duke analysis, published today in Diabetologia, included nearly 2,500 diabetes trials conducted worldwide between 2007 and 2010, taken from the ClinicalTrials.gov study registry. Only 10 percent of the trials focused on prevention efforts, while the vast majority — 75 percent — assessed treatments for people who already have the disease. The remaining 15 percent of studies examined diabetes screening and diagnostic procedures, supportive care, and other topics.
 
The analysis also showed nearly two-thirds of all diabetes trials investigated medications, primarily for treatment rather than prevention. A much smaller proportion — 12 percent — focused on behavioral strategies, such as lifestyle change programs, education, and counseling.
 
“I don’t think anybody knows what the optimal percentage of diabetes trials being dedicated to prevention really is,” said Jennifer Green, MD, the senior author of the study.
 
However, said Dr. Green, research to identify successful prevention strategies and methods for translating those efforts into the real world could have substantial benefits.
 
“If we can prevent the development of diabetes in a significant number of individuals, that should theoretically reduce healthcare costs and minimize the likelihood that those people develop diabetes-related complications in the future,” Green said. Health organizations like the IDF and the American Diabetes Association have also emphasized the need for more prevention research.
 
The high proportion of trials testing drug treatments is partly a reflection of funding, according to Sue Kirkman, MD, an endocrinologist at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine who was not involved in the new study. "Many of the studies received funding from pharmaceutical companies and that's part of the reason there were so many drug studies," she said.
 
On the other hand, researchers testing lifestyle change and other non-medication treatments may have a more difficult time securing funding, Green speculated.
Minimal Diabetes Research in Older Adults and Children 
 
The analysis also revealed that very few studies focused on older adults, a group at especially high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Nearly 20 percent of adults aged 65 and older worldwide have diabetes, yet only 1 percent of trials specifically targeted this population, and 31 percent excluded this age group.
 
“I think the exclusion of older people from so many of these studies is a huge problem,” said Dr. Kirkman. “The population that’s going to be disproportionately needing these treatments is being excluded from the studies of treatments. That just really struck me as unwise.”
 
“People aged 65 and older need to use the same kinds of medications as younger individuals to treat their diabetes, but it may be that their responses are different,” said Green. “They probably have different needs and care considerations that would benefit from future study.”
 
Only 4 percent of diabetes trials specifically looked at children aged 18 and under. Experts said this number may be appropriate, given the very small proportion of children who have diabetes relative to adults, but the youngest patients, like the oldest, may need different care.
 
“The kinds of treatments that we routinely used for adults may not work as well in children, and that is certainly something we should try to better understand,” Green said.
 
The researchers also found that some areas of the world with high rates of diabetes have not been actively involved in diabetes research. For example, six of the 10 countries with the highest diabetes rates are located in the Middle East, yet few trials have been conducted in this region.
 
“This is something that people who are designing and executing trials going forward might want to consider so we can include high-risk groups,” according to Green. “It seems wise and only fair for these treatments to be tested in diverse populations before they are prescribed.”
The Future of Diabetes Research 
 
This study provides a snapshot of recent diabetes research efforts, but experts are most interested in seeing how these trends change over time.
 
“I do think we need more trials on prevention, more trials in children, and definitely more trials in older people with or at risk for diabetes,” said Kirkman. “I would be interested in seeing the same analysis in 2015 to see if things have changed. I think the real issue is seeing if things are going to get better.”
 
"This study is an interesting starting point," Green commented. "We're hoping that this stimulates conversation and might be helpful in determining what kinds of research efforts are funded in the future."
Apr 06
2013

Top Diets for Diabetes

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

According to government figures, more than 85 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese (although excess weight isn't the only risk factor for this type of diabetes). But for people with type 2 diabetes who fall into that 85 percent, dropping the pounds can help stabilize blood sugar levels and even eliminate the need for diabetes medication. 
 
So which diet can help you achieve your weight-loss goals? There's no one right answer. But, says Nora Saul, RD, CDE, a certified diabetes educator and manager of nutritional education at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, “people who have diabetes can, with a little forethought, use many of the healthy popular diets.” 
Weight-Loss Plans for Type 2 Diabetes 
 
If you have type 2 diabetes and want to lose weight, here are some sensible diet options to try. 
 
DASH Diet: “Although originally designed to lower blood pressure, DASH — or Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension — is an all-around good eating plan,” says Saul. In fact, U.S. News and World Report rated the DASH diet as tops for treating diabetes in a May 2011 article. That's because the diet is high in fruits and vegetables, which means it's high in fiber, antioxidants, and potassium. It’s also high in low-fat dairy, calcium, lean protein, and whole grains. “It has meal plans for different calorie levels,” says Saul, which allows flexibility according to your weight. 
 
South Beach Diet: The South Beach Diet is a modified low-carb diet that emphasizes healthy fats. If you want to try it, Saul advises sticking to the maintenance phase of the diet. “The initial phases are too low in carbohydrates,” Saul points out. Yes, people with diabetes have to watch how many carbs and the type of carbs they eat, but you don’t want to cut them out entirely. “I encourage whole grains,” says Saul, who warns against eliminating any specific food group, even for weight loss. (Note: Everyday Health is the publisher of SouthBeachDiet.com.) 
 
Weight Watchers: Weight Watchers is a popular commercial weight-loss plan. It’s also a good choice if you have type 2 diabetes, in part because the system provides group support and accountability in addition to a structured eating plan. People with diabetes might need to make some modifications to the diet plan, however. For example, explains Saul, in the latest version of Weight Watchers counting system or "points," fruit has zero points. But for people with diabetes, a serving size of fruit does count toward total carb intake for the day. 
 
Mediterranean Diet: Though not a specific eating plan, a Mediterranean diet mimics the way that people who live in countries around the Mediterranean Sea, such as Greece and Italy, tend to eat. Rich in beans, nuts, fruits, vegetables, grains, and seafood, it isn’t so much a weight-loss diet as a different way of eating. “People lose weight because they are full and are not eating a lot of the empty calories they consumed before,” says Saul, who says this concept works well for people with diabetes, too. 
 
Atkins Diet: The Atkins Diet gained fame as the diet that led the low-carb diet revolution twice. This diet may be a good option for some people and can help manage blood sugar levels, but it can be too restrictive and may not be a long-term lifestyle choice for everyone with diabetes. However, reading about and trying out this diet could be a learning experience in terms of understanding how carbs function in your diet. 
 
Jenny Craig: Jenny Craig (now rebranded as Jenny) is a personalized eating and diet program that includes a lot of support as well as prepackaged meals. The catch is that it can be costly and, although the diet plan is intended to ultimately help you make your own meals and food choices, some people might find it difficult to get out of the habit of relying on a stocked freezer. Finally, people with diabetes that is not adequately controlled may be discouraged from enrolling. 
 
GI Diet: A low glycemic index (GI) diet is an excellent choice for people with type 2 diabetes, Saul says. This one might require some research and study until you understand exactly where foods fit in the glycemic index and how you can include the right ones in your diet. The glycemic index lets you know how fast a 50-gram portion of a carbohydrate food raises blood sugar in comparison with white bread. The lower the number, the better the food is for controlling blood sugar. 
 
Whatever diet you decide on, there are a few overarching principles that should guide your choice. Among them, look for diets that include food you like (or will come to like) and that don’t rely on expensive supplements or tools. And be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any weight-loss regimen.
Apr 02
2013

Why Is It So Hard to Exercise?

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

You know you should do it. And you know why: Exercising -- simply put, moving instead of sitting -- is critical for safeguarding your health and setting a good example for your kids. So why does it seem so hard to get yourself moving?

Mar 30
2013

Overcoming Barriers

Posted by: admin

Tagged in: Untagged 

A barrier is something that keeps you from doing something else.

«StartPrev12345678910NextEnd»

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Categories

Tags